Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

Potential Damages

Potential damages arising from the failure to achieve statutory or contractual requirements concerning Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) or other green building standards are far ranging and may include: fines, loss of financing or tax incentives, loss of tenants, decreased building value, decreased worker productivity, and increased utility costs.

Direct v. Consequential Damages

Damages are often characterized as direct or consequential. Generally speaking, direct damages are foreseeable and naturally and ordinarily follow the breach, whereas consequential damages are unforeseeable to the breaching party and result from special circumstances. For example, if you were in a car accident, the damage to your car and medical expenses to treat whiplash would be direct damages. If you were on your way to a job interview and lost the job because you missed the interview due to the accident, the lost wages would likely be consequential damages. In our context, a fine arising from the failure to achieve a statutory LEED requirement, such as Silver certification, is probably a direct damage. However, the loss of revenue due to tenants who back out of leases because the building is not LEED certified may be a consequential damage.
Continue Reading Contract Drafting Tip: “LEED” Damages and the Waiver of Consequential Damages Clause